Forums
By 
John Walton
 on June 22, 2009

The Lost World of Genesis One

What was God’s intention for the beginning portions of the Bible? What is its cultural context? In this highly readable volume, John Walton formulates a literary and theological understanding of Genesis 1 within the context of the ancient Near Eastern world.

Share  
Twitter
Facebook
LinkedIn
Print

Before You Read

Dear reader,

We’ll get right to it: Young people today are departing the faith in historic numbers as the church is either unwilling or unable to address their questions on science and faith. BioLogos is hosting those tough conversations. Not with anger, but with grace. Not with a simplistic position to earn credibility on the left or the right, but a message that is informed, faithful, and hopeful.

Although voices on both sides are loud and extreme, we are breaking through. But as a nonprofit, we rely on the generosity of donors like you to continue this challenging work. Your tax deductible gift today will help us continue to counter the polarizing narratives of today with a message that is informed, hopeful, and faithful.

The Lost World of Genesis One Book CoverIn this astute mix of cultural critique and biblical studies, John H. Walton presents and defends twenty propositions supporting a literary and theological understanding of Genesis 1 within the context of the ancient Near Eastern world and unpacks its implications for our modern scientific understanding of origins. Ideal for students, professors, pastors and lay readers with an interest in the intelligent design controversy and creation-evolution debates, Walton’s thoughtful analysis unpacks seldom appreciated aspects of the biblical text and sets Bible-believing scientists free to investigate the question of origins.

John Walton is professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College (IL). His book addresses questions such as:

  • What was God’s intention for the beginning portions of the Bible?
  • What is its cultural context?
  • What would an observer have seen during the seven days of Genesis 1?
  • What does it really mean to understand God as Creator?

Walton proposes a reading of Genesis 1 that is, “faithful to the context of the original audience and author, and one that preserves and enhances the theological vitality” of the text. Instead of chapters, the book contains eighteen “propositions” which lay out his case in accessible, non-technical language understandable by educators, pastors, students, scholars, and laypeople alike. This is an excellent high school Bible or science curriculum supplement, as well as a great addition for homeschoolers and/or homeschool co-ops.

This book was the focus of a past BioLogos Book Club and all resources are collected below for continued use in various small group settings.