From a Scientist to Her Parents


Hi Mom and Dad,

Here are some facts about the two approved vaccines, so you can make informed decisions.

Pfizer’s trial enrolled over 10 times as many people as in a normal Phase III drug trial (over 41,000 people and counting).  The trial started July 27, so there are 5 months of healthy people (the published report checked their health after two months). Moderna is a second vaccine made with the same technology and testing.

vial of COVID-19 vaccine held by a gloved handBoth vaccines work 95% of the timethat is great for a vaccine! (It blows the flu shot out of the water!). A remaining question is how long the immunity will last. So far, so good, though.

RNA vaccine ingredients are safe!

  • NO preservatives (has to be kept frozen and used right away).
  • It is NOT made in the human cells like other vaccines (see postscript).
  • There is NO inactivated virus or proteins.
  • Here is the ingredient list (Pfizer) (Moderna):  RNA, lipids (fats), salts (sodium, potassium, chloride), sucrose (sugar).

Vaccine side effects are the normal symptoms of your body’s immune system working to create immunity.  The vaccine itself is RNA; the instructions for the immune response.  The RNA is only temporary so there is nothing left over except protection!

The best vaccine to get is the one that becomes available to you. Other companies are making more traditional vaccines, but these won’t be available for a while longer. Traditional vaccines do take longer to develop, which is why people are surprised at how quickly the mRNA vaccines arrived.

Yeah Science!!

Your family very much wishes that both of you get the vaccine. It will give us peace of mind that you will be protected from a virus that we could carry in and cause you so much suffering. Your grandchildren will be able to visit you that much sooner too!

Love you!!
Your Scientist Daughter


Jennifer Ness-Myers
About the Author

Jennifer Ness-Myers

Jennifer Ness-Myers is an assistant professor of biology at Messiah University.  Her research in neurobiology focuses on cell signaling pathways that regulate oligodendrocyte development and remyelination.  She holds a B.A. in Biology from Concordia College and a Ph.D. in Molecular Medicine from the Pennsylvania State University.