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Published on November 01, 2015

The Crossroads of Science and Faith: Astronomy Through a Christian Worldview

This text presents an ancient view of our universe and brings much more than just great astronomy to students.

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Before You Read

Dear reader,

We’ll get right to it: Young people today are departing the faith in historic numbers as the church is either unwilling or unable to address their questions on science and faith. BioLogos is hosting those tough conversations. Not with anger, but with grace. Not with a simplistic position to earn credibility on the left or the right, but a message that is informed, faithful, and hopeful.

Although voices on both sides are loud and extreme, we are breaking through. But as a nonprofit, we rely on the generosity of donors like you to continue this challenging work. Your tax deductible gift today will help us continue to counter the polarizing narratives of today with a message that is informed, hopeful, and faithful.

The Crossroads of Science and Faith: Astronomy Through a Christian Worldview Book CoverThis textbook presents an ancient view of our universe and brings much more than just great astronomy to students. (Christian, high school, homeschool or Christian school)

First, Part I of the text is devoted to addressing the broader faith and science conversation and teachers are encouraged to cover this material alongside the astronomy content in Part II. Topics include: what is a worldview, scientific and religious searches for truth, avoiding a conflict mentality when students view faith and science, and how to use appropriate tools of logic in interactions with science and faith topics. Homework assignments allow students to interact with claims from numerous modern day thinkers including philosophers, theologians, and scientists. Even within the astronomy content, we find attention to science and faith interaction through discussion questions that challenge students to interact with the science they are learning in new ways. When origins issues are brought up, the authors acknowledge a spectrum of Christian perspectives, including evolutionary creation.

Another strength of the text is its incorporation of numerous interviews with working astronomers who are also committed believers. These personal stories shed light on the challenges these scientists can sometimes face in their workaday lives. Students also see examples of committed believers engaged in scientific work as a way to honor God through their vocations.

Would BioLogos be in agreement with everything that’s presented here? Not necessarily. When it comes to refuting atheistic claims, the authors tend to rely heavily on Christian organizations that support an old-earth view but who don’t uphold evolutionary science, but this text is a welcome addition to the Christian curricula landscape.