Our Inner Ape

Published on August 01, 2006

by Frans de Waal
Riverhead Trade, 2006

Primatologist de Waal looks at our two closest primate relatives and how they shed light on human behavior today.

Description

“Noted primatologist de Waal (Chimpanzee Politics) thinks human behavior cannot be fully explained by selfish genes and Darwinian competition. Drawing on his own primate research on chimpanzees and bonobos—our closest animal relatives—he shows how much we can learn from them about ourselves: our qualities of “fellow feeling and empathy” as well as our power-obsessed, violent side. We are “bipolar apes,” de Waal says, as much like bonobos as like chimps. The latter are known for their viciousness and “red in tooth and claw” social politics, but bonobos offer a radically different social model, one of peace and hedonistic orgies; de Waal offers vivid, often delightful stories of politics, sex, violence and kindness in the ape communities he has studied to illustrate such questions as why we are irreverent toward the powerful and whether men or women are better at conflict resolution. Readers might be surprised at how much these apes and their stories resonate with their own lives, and may well be left with an urge to spend a few hours watching primates themselves at the local zoo.” – Publishers Weekly


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