Thinking About Divine Action: An Attempt to Dissolve the Problem

The problem of divine action considers how God interacts with the world. I’m not talking about miraculous interventions like the resurrection of Jesus, but the providence with which God governs and directs the normal course of things for which there are increasingly complete scientific explanations. For example, how do we understand God’s role in creating human beings through an evolutionary process? This is a difficult question, but I’ll suggest we exacerbate it when we confuse scientific explanations with personal explanations.

Jim Stump | BioLogos 

Stephen Freeland, Astrobiologist and the Director of Interdisciplinary Studies at UMBC

As a Christian and an evolutionary biologist, I support with enthusiasm the work of BioLogos as part of my personal commitment to nurture dialog (dia-Logos!) between science and the Christian faith. I identify most strongly with the organization’s eleventh article of belief (“What we believe”): We believe that conversations among Christians about controversial issues of science and faith can and must be conducted with humility, grace, honesty, and compassion as a visible sign of the Spirit’s presence in Christ’s body, the Church.

- Stephen Freeland, Astrobiologist and the Director of Interdisciplinary Studies at UMBC