In this series, Ted Davis reflects on the interaction of science and Christianity during the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries, a time when foundations for modern science were quickly developing. He dismisses the idea that the influential areas of theology and science hold opposing views about the world and also explains how the Church enthusiastically supported and encouraged the growth of the various scientific disciplines, especially during the pre-Copernican time. He goes on to elaborate on the Copernican and Galileo controversies as well as highlight the faith of well-known scientists such as Kepler, Boyle, and Polkinghorne.
  • Christianity and Science in Historical Perspective, Part 1

    Blog Post
    Christianity and Science in Historical Perspective, Part 1

        Ask the person on the street for an opinion about science and religion, and you are likely to hear something about a confrontation, perhaps combined with a reference... Read More >

    Going Deeper PART 1 of 3
  • Christianity and Science in Historical Perspective, Part 2

    | Ted Davis
    Blog Post
    Christianity and Science in Historical Perspective, Part 2 | Ted Davis

        Contrary to what is often said or implied, Copernicus had full freedom to pursue his ideas while working for the church and was even encouraged to publish them. Read More >

    Going Deeper PART 2 of 3
  • Christianity and Science in Historical Perspective, Part 3

    | Ted Davis
    Blog Post
    Christianity and Science in Historical Perspective, Part 3 | Ted Davis

        God is free to create in ways that cannot be predicted, so we should not be astonished that nature sometimes does astonishing things. Read More >

    Going Deeper PART 3 of 3