Tim O'Connor

Tim O'Connor

Indiana University

Tim O’Connor has taught philosophy at Indiana University-Bloomington, since 1993, apart from year-long research fellowships at the Universities of Notre Dame, St. Andrews, and Oxford. He has given over 160 academic and popular lectures in 22 countries. His main areas of scholarship and teaching are metaphysics, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of religion. He has published over 70 scholarly articles, edited seven books, and written two monographs, one on free will and the other on God and the quest for ultimate explanation. He is now writing a third book for a broader audience, Thinking About Faith: Philosophy, Science, and Christian Belief. On his website, he claims to be the ‘Philo-Pong World Grad Champion,’ or top table tennis player among professional philosophers.

Topics include:

  • Christian faith and philosophy
  • Christian faith and science
  • God and scientific explanation
  • Science and the soul
  • Evolution and religion or morality

 

  • Human Moral Responsibility and the Sciences of the Mind

    | Tim O'Connor
    Blog Post
    Human Moral Responsibility and the Sciences of the Mind | Tim O'Connor

      “it's fair to conclude, the supposed threat posed to human free will and moral responsibility from the very much work-in-progress social and cognitive human sciences is ... Read More >

    Advanced
  • Southern Baptist Voices: A Response to John Hammett, Part 1

    | Tim O'Connor
    Blog Post
    Southern Baptist Voices: A Response to John Hammett, Part 1 | Tim O'Connor

    The Scriptures teach that we human beings have been created in God’s image. What does that mean? I am in substantial agreement with Dr. Hammett on this question.   Read More >

    Going Deeper PART 2 of 3
  • Southern Baptist Voices: A Response to John Hammett, Part 2

    | Tim O'Connor
    Blog Post
    Southern Baptist Voices: A Response to John Hammett, Part 2 | Tim O'Connor

    This account is overlooked by Christians and scientifically-educated religious skeptics alike, because both camps tend to assume an extremely reductionist view of the physical world. Read More >

    Advanced PART 3 of 3