Stephen  Schaffner

Stephen Schaffner is a computational biologist in the Program in Medical and Population Genetics at the Broad Institute, where he studies genetics of humans and the malaria parasite.

He often focuses on detecting cases of positive natural selection, where a given trait is beneficial for the organism and is therefore selected for in the population. Schaffner performs computer simulations of genetic variation and studies the history of human demographics. He also works to understand linkage disequilibrium, a term used in the field of population genetics to describe a combination of genetic markers that occurs more or less often than expected. These studies can aid the search for genetic markers linked to traits or disease.

Schaffner joined the Whitehead Institute in 1999 and later the Broad. He earned a Ph.D. in experimental particle physics from Yale University.

  • Testing Common Ancestry: It’s All About the Mutations

    | Stephen Schaffner
    Blog Post
    Testing Common Ancestry: It’s All About the Mutations | Stephen Schaffner

    The genetic differences between humans and primates look exactly like what we would expect if we shared a common ancestor.  Read More >

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