Robert C. Bishop

Robert C. Bishop is the John and Madeline McIntyre Endowed Professor of Philosophy and History of Science and an associate professor of physics and philosophy at Wheaton College in Illinois. He received his master’s degree in physics and doctorate in philosophy from the University of Texas at Austin. Bishop's research involves history and philosophy of science, philosophy of physics, philosophy of mind, and metaphysics. Bishop is the author of The Philosophy of the Social Sciences (Continuum International Publishing Group, 2007), co-editor of Between Chance and Choice: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Determinism (Imprint Academic, 2007), and co-author of Understanding Scientific Theories of Origins: Cosmology, Geology, and Biology in Christian Perspective (IVP Academic, 2018).

  • 5 Wheaton College Professors Release New Book on Theories of Origins

    | Robert C. Bishop
    Blog Post
    5 Wheaton College Professors Release New Book on Theories of Origins | Robert C. Bishop

    Latest in the BioLogos Books series at InterVarsity Press, this book covers the best contemporary scientific theories for the creation of the universe, Earth, life, diversity of life,... Read More >

  • An Evolutionary Journey

    | Robert C. Bishop
    Blog Post
    An Evolutionary Journey | Robert C. Bishop

    Robert C. Bishop shares how he came to see that scientific descriptions of natural processes are fully compatible with God’s being at work in and through those processes. Read More >

    Going Deeper
  • The Extended Synthesis (Reviewing “Darwin’s Doubt”: Robert Bishop, Part 1)

    | Robert C. Bishop
    Blog Post
    The Extended Synthesis (Reviewing “Darwin’s Doubt”: Robert Bishop, Part 1) | Robert C. Bishop

    Many biologists are pursuing an extended synthesis, involving population genetics, developmental biology, and more, yet Meyer presents their work as offering an alternative to neo-Dar... Read More >

    Going Deeper PART 3 of 11
  • What Does It Mean to Be Human? A Response to Bruce Little, Part 2

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    Blog Post
    What Does It Mean to Be Human? A Response to Bruce Little, Part 2 | Robert C. Bishop

    Trinitarian theology and the image of God are important, non-essentialist resources to help us think about the distinct place of humanity in creation as essentially relational beings.... Read More >

    Going Deeper PART 4 of 4
  • What Does It Mean to Be Human? A Response to Bruce Little, Part 1

    | Robert C. Bishop
    Blog Post
    What Does It Mean to Be Human? A Response to Bruce Little, Part 1 | Robert C. Bishop

    Metaphysical naturalism is not necessary nor inextricably tied to the practice of science, and essentialism is only one of the historically Christian ways to think about being human... Read More >

    Going Deeper PART 3 of 4
  • A Response to Coyne (and Contemporary Atheists Generally), Part 2

    | Robert C. Bishop
    Blog Post
    A Response to Coyne (and Contemporary Atheists Generally), Part 2 | Robert C. Bishop

    Central to Coyne and these atheists’ approach to religion is what looks to be a straightforward intellectual or scientific value: objectification.  Read More >

    Advanced PART 5 of 5
  • Evolution, Myths and Reconciliation: Part 3

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    Evolution, Myths and Reconciliation: Part 3 | Robert C. Bishop

    Reconciliation is a much more demanding task than integration because it means an ongoing conversation between us and the unpredictability of how that conversation may affect each of ... Read More >

    Going Deeper PART 3 of 5
  • Evolution, Myths and Reconciliation: Part 2

    | Robert C. Bishop
    Blog Post
    Evolution, Myths and Reconciliation: Part 2 | Robert C. Bishop

    The image of God as an engineer or designer is a creation of 18th century deism, not a biblical image. Read More >

    Going Deeper PART 2 of 5
  • Recovering the Doctrine of Creation, Part 5

    | Robert C. Bishop
    Blog Post
    Recovering the Doctrine of Creation, Part 5 | Robert C. Bishop

    Sometimes Christians and non-Christians alike fall into thinking that God is only active in creation when there are miraculous violations of natural laws. Read More >

    Going Deeper PART 5 of 5
  • Recovering the Doctrine of Creation, Part 4

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    Recovering the Doctrine of Creation, Part 4 | Robert C. Bishop

    Another element of the Doctrine of Creation is the idea that God’s action in creation parallels His action in salvation and sanctification. Read More >

    Going Deeper PART 4 of 5
  • Recovering the Doctrine of Creation, Part 3

    | Robert C. Bishop
    Blog Post
    Recovering the Doctrine of Creation, Part 3 | Robert C. Bishop

    We’re used to thinking about how God is personally involved in the lives of His people, but we rarely think about how the Trinity is personally involved in creation. Read More >

    Going Deeper PART 3 of 5
  • Recovering the Doctrine of Creation, Part 2

    | Robert C. Bishop
    Blog Post
    Recovering the Doctrine of Creation, Part 2 | Robert C. Bishop

    It is often forgotten in Christian thinking about creation that Jesus and the Holy Spirit are intimately involved in creation (Irenaeus famously referred to them as God’s &ldquo... Read More >

    Going Deeper PART 2 of 5
  • Recovering the Doctrine of Creation: A Theological View of Science, Part 1

    | Robert C. Bishop
    Blog Post
    Recovering the Doctrine of Creation: A Theological View of Science, Part 1 | Robert C. Bishop

    Robert C. Bishop argues that the view that God created the universe in six days does not do the Doctrine of Creation justice and unnecessarily hinders the dialogue between evolution a... Read More >

    Going Deeper