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No Place Like Home: an interview with ECF grantee Seung-Hwan Kim

Everyone is so worried about success and getting this or that honorable diploma—the people here are smart and understand many complex things perfectly—but it’s a long distance from the head to the heart.

 

Not So Dry Bones: An interview with Mary Schweitzer

We don’t have all the answers and never will. And when God says that he is revealed in his creation, I think that means we need to take care of what we have and understand where we came from. The more I understand how things work, the bigger God gets. When he was just a magician pulling things out of a hat, that doesn’t even compare to how I see him now!

 

Origins News Roundup for July 9, 2014

This week in origins news is a rousing medley of articles about science and faith, from multiple angles. Some classics on science, religion, and the classroom along with some probing into where atheists come from, new resources from John Polkinghorne, and an off-the-beaten-path blog post.

 

Series: Seeing God in Everyday Work (2 entries)

 

Christ, Trinity, and Creation, Part 2

Christ is the reason the natural sciences work: he is the source of the laws of nature, and he contains and underpins the natural sciences. Christ is the pattern for all created things, while the Spirit – his presence in the created world – breathes the divine fire into the equations.

 

The Creator’s Canvas: How should Christian science teachers approach controversial issues?

Most Christian students have a lot of questions about evolution and the other controversies, but are afraid to ask them for fear of the adults gasping in horror. The right way for a Christian teacher to proceed is to accommodate questions, foster inquiry, and encourage students to think and engage with the issues.

 

Creation for Kids

Children’s books are more than stories. They can become familiar narratives children listen to over and over. So it’s worth asking - Are the books we’re reading doing a good job of portraying God and His Creation?

 

Series: Creation, Evolution, and the Over-Active Imagination (2 entries)

 

Still Surprised by Easter

We now take for granted an understanding of the Christian story that was largely worked out by Paul and later theologians. Even though the Gospels were composed after Paul’s letters, they were concerned to tell the story itself in all its strangeness as it had been preserved by the first generation of Christians. And what we find in the stories themselves is the shock and wonder and surprise that the resurrection caused.

 

New Videos Online from the ECF “Author of Life” Project

When you are in church, do you act and speak differently than when you are in school? Do you tend to compartmentalize what you learn about in Biology class from what you learn about in Sunday School?

 

Interpreting Adam: Introduction

Four Views on the Historical Adam shows that evangelical Christians are far from agreeing on the particulars of Adam and Eve. But this book also makes clear that there is strong agreement among evangelical Christians on the fundamentals of the Christian faith. We agree that all Scripture is inspired by God and authoritative, even while disagreeing on the interpretation of some passages.

 

Creation Out of Nothing

The key point of continuity between redemption and creation is the idea that the future can be different from the past, i.e., the key is eschatology. More abstractly put, God does new things.

 

The Noah Movie

Russell Crowe as Noah was no superhero. He was very human—perhaps too human for those who’d prefer he remain in the flannel graph world of our Sunday School stories.

 

Series: “The Language of God” Book Club (7 entries)

The BioLogos Book Club discussion of Francis Collins’ The Language of God.

 

Praying the Psalms: Psalm 19

The Psalmist is saying that when we walk outside and look up, the heavens are telling us two things about God: they tell us about his glory, and they tell us about what his hands can do.

 

An Enriched Creation

Scripture gives us multiple ways of looking at things, and a classic example of this is the parables of Jesus. Many of these involve looking at nature. For example, natural events like seeds growing—and what Jesus seems to be saying is look there is a surface reading of nature—and then there is the deeper reading, where you begin to realize there are levels of meaning that we don’t pick up on our first acquaintance.

 

Origins News Round-up for Friday, February 14, 2014

Read today’s News Roundup for BioLogos-curated collection of articles analyzing and commenting on last week’s debate between Bill Nye and Ken Ham—as well as some Valentine’s Day amusements.

 

Seeing God in the Stars

As a Christian, I can’t think of a more beautiful process for God to have blessed the production of the elements that we need for life than the beauty of stars. In fact, we are told that we shine like stars in the universe.

 

To Tame the World: What terrifies us about reality pushes us toward its Creator.

We can understand why man, modern man in particular, would like to mop the floors and bleach the walls. We might not be able to tame reality, but we can tame our perception of reality. We intellectualize in order to feel in control.

 

Trying all Things: The Importance of Experience in Scriptural Interpretation

“All of a sudden, it was possible to grant a text deep authority (a ‘high view of scripture’ we say) while discounting neither our own experience, nor the historical experience of those writing, compiling, editing that same text. To put it differently, all of a sudden, history mattered—the history of the text itself, and the history of our interpretations of a text.”

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196 resources found (displaying 1-20)
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