Resource Finder

« Previous page
152 resources found (displaying 1-20)
Page: 1 2 3 4 8
 

No Place Like Home: An interview with ECF grantee Seung-Hwan Kim

Everyone is so worried about success and getting this or that honorable diploma—the people here are smart and understand many complex things perfectly—but it’s a long distance from the head to the heart.

 

Not So Dry Bones: An interview with Mary Schweitzer

We don’t have all the answers and never will. And when God says that he is revealed in his creation, I think that means we need to take care of what we have and understand where we came from. The more I understand how things work, the bigger God gets. When he was just a magician pulling things out of a hat, that doesn’t even compare to how I see him now!

 

Origins News Roundup for July 9, 2014

This week in origins news is a rousing medley of articles about science and faith, from multiple angles. Some classics on science, religion, and the classroom along with some probing into where atheists come from, new resources from John Polkinghorne, and an off-the-beaten-path blog post.

 

Series: Seeing God in Everyday Work (2 entries)

 

The Christian Reformed Church votes to support scholarship on human origins

We should celebrate the many times that our churches and colleges encourage scholarship. I saw several delegates at Synod stand up and speak directly about the importance of supporting scholars who engage the science and religion dialogue. The recent Synod decision was a move in the right direction.

 

Series: The Human Fossil Record (19 entries)

In this series, James Kidder provides an intriguing study on transitional fossils and the evolutionary history of modern humans. He begins by discussing the fossil record, explaining how new forms are classified. He then explains the physically distinguishing trait of humankind—bipedalism. From the discovery of Ardipithecus, the earliest known hominin, to the australopithecines, the most prolific hominin, Kidder focuses on the discovery, the anatomy, and the interpretation of these ancestral remains.

 

What Americans Think and Feel about Evolution

The new Gallup survey shows in broad strokes the challenge we face. But more nuanced surveys find that only 8% of Americans are convinced creationists whose beliefs are dear to them, and only 4% are convinced atheistic evolutionists whose beliefs are dear to them. The vast majority of Americans are not sure of their position and are open to a conversation.

 

The Creator’s Canvas: How should Christian science teachers approach controversial issues?

Most Christian students have a lot of questions about evolution and the other controversies, but are afraid to ask them for fear of the adults gasping in horror. The right way for a Christian teacher to proceed is to accommodate questions, foster inquiry, and encourage students to think and engage with the issues.

 

Creation for Kids

Children’s books are more than stories. They can become familiar narratives children listen to over and over. So it’s worth asking - Are the books we’re reading doing a good job of portraying God and His Creation?

 

Series: Evolution Basics (44 entries)

Written by BioLogos Fellow of Biology Dennis Venema, this series of posts is intended as a basic introduction to the science of evolution for non-specialists.

 

Origins News Round-Up for May 28, 2014

This weeks in Origins news: studies of a skeleton uncovered in 2007 provide clues about rapid human evolution in the Americas, our climate and Christian stewardship, a few BioLogos folks give interviews, and some cool links to miscellaneous finds.

 

Series: Intelligent Design and Common Ancestry (4 entries)

Would those genuinely interested in learning about evolution benefit from a careful explanation of why these common objections don’t hold water? Here the answer seemed to me to be “yes.”

 

Series: Interpreting Adam (6 entries)

A few months ago Zondervan published the anthology Four Views on the Historical Adam. This valuable new resource addresses one of the most common questions Christians have about evolution: how does the Adam of the Bible fit with the scientific and historical evidence about early humans?

 

New Videos Online from the ECF “Author of Life” Project

When you are in church, do you act and speak differently than when you are in school? Do you tend to compartmentalize what you learn about in Biology class from what you learn about in Sunday School?

 

Series: “The Language of God” Book Club (7 entries)

The BioLogos Book Club discussion of Francis Collins’ The Language of God.

 

John Ortberg Sermon: Does Science Disprove Faith?

All of you who do science, all of you who teach or research or you’re involved in engineering or medicine or education, or biology or chemistry or physics—you are doing a noble thing. You are thinking God’s thoughts after him. … You are obeying God’s command given way back in Genesis to exercise dominion, to learn about, to be curious and discover and steward the earth.

 

Praying the Psalms: Psalm 19

The Psalmist is saying that when we walk outside and look up, the heavens are telling us two things about God: they tell us about his glory, and they tell us about what his hands can do.

 

Origins News Round-up for Friday, February 14, 2014

Read today’s News Roundup for BioLogos-curated collection of articles analyzing and commenting on last week’s debate between Bill Nye and Ken Ham—as well as some Valentine’s Day amusements.

 

Origins News Round-up for January 17, 2014

Today’s Origins News Roundup features challenging and exciting new ideas about evolutionary theory, fossil finds that add to our understanding of how carnivores and humans developed, some interesting science history from England, and more on American views of evolution.

 

Trying all Things: The Importance of Experience in Scriptural Interpretation

“All of a sudden, it was possible to grant a text deep authority (a ‘high view of scripture’ we say) while discounting neither our own experience, nor the historical experience of those writing, compiling, editing that same text. To put it differently, all of a sudden, history mattered—the history of the text itself, and the history of our interpretations of a text.”

« Previous page
152 resources found (displaying 1-20)
Page: 1 2 3 4 8