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Series: Science and Christianity: A Positive International Dialogue (2 entries)

There is often a worry that working in or studying science is a threat to faith, but stories of scientists who are Christians in the top ranks of academia show that this is not the case.

 

Series: “The Language of God” Book Club (7 entries)

The BioLogos Book Club discussion of Francis Collins’ The Language of God.

 

Series: The Body of Christ in Science (2 entries)

 

Trying all Things: The Importance of Experience in Scriptural Interpretation

“All of a sudden, it was possible to grant a text deep authority (a ‘high view of scripture’ we say) while discounting neither our own experience, nor the historical experience of those writing, compiling, editing that same text. To put it differently, all of a sudden, history mattered—the history of the text itself, and the history of our interpretations of a text.”

 

Three Steps Forward, Two Steps Back

“We were (mostly) prepared for the academic arguments but not necessarily the thing many fear in this discussion: personal conflict.”

 

The Calvin College Summer Seminars in Science and Faith

Having won an ECF grant, Cara Wall-Scheffler, biological anthropologist at Seattle Pacific University, and I are now planning to host a group of 18 young Christian paleobiologists for a week-long seminar during late June, 2014. Our seminar will include guest lectures by scientists, historians, and pastors who all have an interest in discussing bridging faith and science ‘gaps.’

 

What’s in the Works at BioLogos

There is no formula for generating beliefs in people. There are plenty of people with access to the same facts who end up believing different things. But for many Christians—like the ones I heard from this week—access to information about the position we call “evolutionary creation” could make a significant difference for reconciling science and Christian faith.

 

Breaking Down False Dichotomies in Dayton

The great irony lies here: these partisans are actually leading good-hearted people to reject their faith, precisely because these partisans have convinced these good-hearted people that they must accept a false dichotomy.

 

Origins News Roundup for July 9, 2014

This week in origins news is a rousing medley of articles about science and faith, from multiple angles. Some classics on science, religion, and the classroom along with some probing into where atheists come from, new resources from John Polkinghorne, and an off-the-beaten-path blog post.

 

Series: Seeing God in Everyday Work (2 entries)

 

The Creator’s Canvas: How should Christian science teachers approach controversial issues?

Most Christian students have a lot of questions about evolution and the other controversies, but are afraid to ask them for fear of the adults gasping in horror. The right way for a Christian teacher to proceed is to accommodate questions, foster inquiry, and encourage students to think and engage with the issues.

 

Series: Evolution and our Theological Traditions: Calvinism (16 entries)

In this exhaustive series, Pete Enns begins with this question concerning the science and faith discussion among the Evangelical community: “How do our various theological traditions contribute to or hinder the dialogue between evolution and our Christian faith?” It all stems from the specific way in which one interprets Scripture. Though all traditions have an important voice in the matter, Enns specifically looks at that of Calvinism’s due to its wide impact on Evangelical thought. He explains John Calvin’s unique approach to interpreting Scripture and then demonstrates its impact on the conversation between Christianity and science. Furthermore, he looks at how Old Princeton thought has influenced Fundamentalism and Evangelicalism. He also explores ways in which these interpretative methods have been applied. He then highlights the hermeneutical strategies of the theologian B.B. Warfield, who took seriously the incarnation and thus the “human side” to Scriptures. In light of these strategies and interpretational tools provided by Calvinistic thought, he views the creation stories of Genesis in their historical, ancient Near Eastern context.

 

Series: Ephesians 4:1-6: A Call of Christian Unity (9 entries)

This series discusses the importance of unity among Christ’s believers. Ross Hastings, an expert in the areas of both chemistry and pastoral theology, is eager to see the church seek out unity rather than divisions in this science/faith interface. Unpacking Ephesians 4:1-6, he explains that unity in Christ through the Holy Spirit is the primary concern of both Jesus as seen in John 17 and Paul in Ephesians 4, making this matter pressing. He urges all believers to be in agreement that God indeed created, yet to be in dialogue over how that creative process occurred.

 

A Plea to My Shepherds

... I would exhort these, my fellow conservative evangelical shepherds and thinkers, to set aside all reticence and fear, emerge from anonymity, and storm the forum of discourse, engaging this most pressing matter with vigor, equanimity, and humility. In doing so, know upfront that there will be few handrails to guide; you will not be building upon an extensive precedence of published conservative thought.

 

Evangelicalism and Adaptation

I look my students dead straight in the eye and tell them that no matter what, debate within the intellectual sphere cannot and should not take away or diminish the importance of the personal nature of their faith. The intellect, to use a scientific phrase, while necessary for the faith, is not sufficient

 

Evolution and Christian Faith Grantees Announced

Congratulations to the 37 winners of the Evolution & Christian Faith (ECF) grants competition! ECF is a new BioLogos program designed to support projects and network-building among scholars, church leaders, and parachurch organizations.

 

Dissonance and Harmony

People hold clearly discordant points of view, and it would be dishonest to ignore the conflict. Yet some voices emphasize the dissonance without any note of harmony to put it in context. Too often, science and faith becomes a hostile battle of worldviews, sounding angry, dissonant chords even among fellow Christians. But civil, gracious dialogue is possible.

 

Raising Children to Pursue Truth

In this video Conversation, Joel Hunter articulates the importance of raising a child that can garner knowledge from a variety of sources and to be able to study science with integrity—that is, to be able to pursue the truth to where it leads.

 

Series: Medieval Christianity and the Rise of Modern Science (2 entries)

Historian of science James Hannam writes that the notion of inherent conflict between Christianity and science is a pernicious myth. In fact, by the middle ages, science already had a central place in Christian centers of learning. Indeed, it was a Christian worldview that proved especially compatible with—even necessary for—the rise of modern science. In this two-part essay, Hannam describes the conditions in the West in the medieval period that set the stage for the spectacular advance of science in the centuries to follow.

 

Science, Christianity, and Homeschooling

Resilient learners and a robust faith can handle challenges. But the faith of the students my professor described was different— strong, but brittle; it did not have the resilience that comes through testing.

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291 resources found (displaying 1-20)
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