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Scientific Passions

All of science’s discoveries are undergirded by beliefs about the true, good, and beautiful, which makes it all the more tragic when scientists claim to have risen above the search for these things.

 

From Babel to Understanding

We feel that the long-term efforts by ForumC to bring these different factions together are beginning to bear fruit. Where the atmosphere at the first conference was at times tense, this second conference was perceived by all those present as more relaxed and open. The willingness to concede past? errors and the problems involved in the respective positions taken was one clear sign of this.

 

Faith after Literalism: An Interview with Michael Gungor

Musician Michael Gungor talks about the recent controversy over the evolution of his views on evolution, science, and biblical authority.

 

What Do the Arts Have to Do with Evangelism?

The purpose of Jesus’s art was to give verbal, visual, and dramatic forms to those complicated and confounding relationships, symmetries, and harmonies between himself, the father and spirit, and between the triune God and the world… Such creative expressions did not and do not make everything clear, but rather resist simple clarity, forcing their hearers to come at the whole complicated truth from a position of intellectual and spiritual humility.

 

Series: Excerpts from “Evolving: Evangelicals Reflect on Evolution” (13 entries)

We need to hear stories from others who have wrestled with evolution and Christian faith. What arguments made them change their views on science? How did they hold fast to their relationship with God? The essays in this series will eventually comprise a book, provisionally titled, “Evolving: Evangelicals Reflect on Evolution.”

 

Breaking Down False Dichotomies in Dayton

The great irony lies here: these partisans are actually leading good-hearted people to reject their faith, precisely because these partisans have convinced these good-hearted people that they must accept a false dichotomy.

 

No Place Like Home: An interview with ECF grantee Seung-Hwan Kim

Everyone is so worried about success and getting this or that honorable diploma—the people here are smart and understand many complex things perfectly—but it’s a long distance from the head to the heart.

 

Series: Belief in God in a World Explained by Science (3 entries)

 

Evolution Basics: At the Frontiers of Evolution, Part 2: Abiogenesis and the Question of Naturalism

But Dennis, you might say, aren’t you assuming that life had a “natural” origin? Aren’t you discounting the possibility that God might have brought life about through supernatural means? Haven’t you capitulated to “naturalism” from the outset?

 

Origins News Roundup for July 9, 2014

This week in origins news is a rousing medley of articles about science and faith, from multiple angles. Some classics on science, religion, and the classroom along with some probing into where atheists come from, new resources from John Polkinghorne, and an off-the-beaten-path blog post.

 

Series: Seeing God in Everyday Work (2 entries)

 

From Cosmos to Psyche: The 2014 ASA/CSCA/CiS Annual Meeting

We are interactive human beings with a capability and a need to connect with others. Those connections can be through electronic or written means but nothing can replace the need for direct personal engagement. Our annual meetings continue to provide that interaction in an environment of open discussion and often vigorous debates.

 

The Creator’s Canvas: How should Christian science teachers approach controversial issues?

Most Christian students have a lot of questions about evolution and the other controversies, but are afraid to ask them for fear of the adults gasping in horror. The right way for a Christian teacher to proceed is to accommodate questions, foster inquiry, and encourage students to think and engage with the issues.

 

Religion, Science, and Society

Conflicts occur when people argue one worldview against another. They may be arguing Atheism versus Monotheism, then pull out science as a weapon saying, "science proves I'm right because of this or that..." In my view, science is rather more limited than this. Science has a lot of interesting resonances with the big questions, and can inform them, but I don’t believe it can answer them.

 

Zoom In, Slow Down: “Replaying” Evolution and the Fall

Zoom in; slow down. These are relevant principles for the conversation between Christian faith and evolution, too, particularly around thorny issues related to human origins and the Fall.

 

What about the Bible?

What we do learn from scripture is that there is only one Creator and that there’s a clear distinction between God and the created world. And that we who are created in the image of God are able to investigate a creation that is remarkably tuned for our discovery.

 

Series: Creation, Evolution, and the Over-Active Imagination (2 entries)

 

The Strange Tension Between Theology and Science

The problem comes when materialism, claiming the authority of science, denies the possibility of all other types of knowledge — reducing human beings to a bag of chemicals and all their hopes and loves to the firing of neurons. Or when religion exceeds its bounds and declares the Earth to be 6,000 years old. In both cases, the besetting sin is the same: the arrogant exclusive claim to know reality.

 

Series: On Creating the Cosmos, by Ted Peters (9 entries)

Last year I introduced readers to one of the leading voices about Christianity and science, John Polkinghorne. I also helped BioLogos bring in another leading voice, Robert Russell. This new series introduces a third prominent Christian thinker, Lutheran theologian Ted Peters, Research Professor Emeritus in Systematic Theology and Ethics at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary, the Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences (http://www.ctns.org/), and the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California.

 

An Impossible World

What if political, social, religious, and scientific groups the world over adopted [a gracious] approach to dialogue and their own desires? What if we didn’t have to be snide and aggressive to get our point across and to elicit cheering (or jeering) from our respective constituencies?

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284 resources found (displaying 1-20)
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