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What about the Bible?

What we do learn from scripture is that there is only one Creator and that there’s a clear distinction between God and the created world. And that we who are created in the image of God are able to investigate a creation that is remarkably tuned for our discovery.

 

Video repost: Chris Tilling on Biblical Genre and Relational Truths

“There are clues in a text as to how the text should be written, so with Genesis, the rhythmic nature of Genesis 1 and 2, the almost poetic, and hymnic, function that it would have played in the liturgy of the earliest Jewish lives… it seems to me that there are clues here that it should be read in a theological way.”

 

BioLogos Basics Video #3: What about the Bible?

What we do learn from scripture is that there is only one Creator and that there’s a clear distinction between God and the created world. And that we who are created in the image of God are able to investigate a creation that is remarkably tuned for our discovery.

 

Is God the Creator?

Does BioLogos believe that God is the creator? Yes, all Christians believe this; the question is, how did God create?

 

Nazarenes Exploring Origins Conference

As people came together for real conversations, they actually listened to one another, which is not always common in the kind of controversial topics we were exploring—topics about origins, evolution, and biblical interpretation.

 

Series: From the Dust (13 entries)

In this series, Ryan Pettey offers several clips from his powerful documentary "From the Dust". This feature-length film is divided up into various sections, each of which wrestles with the difficult problems that arise when reconciling Scripture with the theory of evolution. A light of hope dawns on the science-faith conversation, however, as scientists and theologians engage in honest dialogue about tough issues such as the interpretation of Genesis, the nature of the Fall, and the idea of random design. Their profound insights are sure to enlighten all minds, raise deeper questions, and provoke new thought.

 

A Mediating Voice

In today’s video, theologian Dr. Chris Tilling discusses the need for a mediating voice in the science and faith discussion: "The problem is that not all Scripture wants to be read literally, and to do so is to bypass some of the truth contained in it."

 

Why should Christians consider evolutionary creation?

Because evolution is a challenging subject, many Christians are tempted to simply ignore or reject it. Yet considering evolutionary creation has important benefits for Christians both in our relationship with the Creator, and with our relationships with other people—believers and non-Christians alike. First, Christians should study evolution because (like all the natural sciences) it is the study of God’s creation. Creation itself is a complementary revelation to what is communicated in the Scriptures, and through it God shows how and when he brought about life, to his honor and glory. Studying the creation is also an invitation into a deeper understanding of the attributes and character of Father, Son and Spirit. Second, considering evolutionary creation aids the Church in its gospel mission, supporting young Christians in their faith, helping answer critics, and equipping us to engage effectively in the wider culture. An anti-evolution attitude can harm Christian young people by presenting them with a false choice between pursuing science OR holding to faith. Similarly, a hostile attitude towards evolution can hinder evangelism when seekers hear that they must reject science to follow Christ. On the other hand, studying evolution as a God-ordained process helps Christians refute arguments that science encourages an atheistic worldview. Furthermore, as the church engages front-page issues raised by the rapid growth in science, medicine, and technology, a Christ-centered voice in such areas as bioethics will be stronger if based on a thorough understanding of the natural sciences, including evolution.

(Updated on September 9, 2012)

 

Reconciliation

In today’s video, Brian McClaren talks about reconciliation in the face of differences. He offers insight into how to treat those whose opinions differ from yours and points out how to have constructive dialogue.

 

Discerning Intention

In today's video, Revd. Dr. David Wenham discusses how defending the Truth of scripture doesn't always require an ultra-literalistic interpretation.

 

Revealing God's Nature

In today's video, Brian McLaren discusses the value of considering Scripture in light of the cultures that surrounded them. The Biblical writers were aware of the myths of the power nations that surrounded them, but flipped their stories on their heads to reveal truth about God.

 

Below the Surface; Behind the Scene

In this video, Alister McGrath discusses the importance of going beyond surface readings, both in Scripture and in the natural world. The parable of the sower, for example, contains a far deeper meaning than a story of a man scattering seed.

 

Narrative Theology

When addressing the science and faith dialogue, one of the first things we must look at is how we interpret scripture. In today's video, Nancey Murphy discusses the importance of narratives as a tool for the ancient writers to teach theological truths, especially about the nature of creation.

 

Biblical Genre and Relational Truth

In today’s video, theologian Chris Tilling discusses biblical genre and the relational truth of Scripture. Tilling notes that when we read the Biblical text, we bring our own presuppositions and assumptions to the text (what theologians call “eisegesis”).

 

Navigating the Crises

In this video, Brian McLaren discusses the idea of surrogate arguments, in which a debate over one thing is really a means for arguing something completely different. According to McClaren, the argument over the age of the earth is one such argument.

 

A Pastor’s Perspective on the Dangers of an Ultra-Literal Perspective

In this video Conversation, Greg Boyd notes that some believers conceive of their faith as a “house of cards”—where shifting one element will collapse the whole thing.

 

Challenging Old Assumptions

In this video “Conversation,” Pete Enns addresses some assumptions about ancient readers and writers that are relevant to the way we should read Genesis in the 21st century.

 

What Do You Mean by ‘Literal’?

In this video Conversation, Rev. N.T. Wright responds to the question, “If you take Genesis in a non-literal fashion, especially the creation stories, why take anything in the Bible literally—such as the Gospels? Do you take the Gospels literally?”

 

Calvin and Wesley: Making Peace with Competing Approaches

In this video Conversation, Joel Hunter notes the inherent strengths of both Calvinist and Wesleyan faith traditions. In fact, he points out that what are often cast as “competing” approaches really are complementary rather than at odds with one another.

 

On Myth and Meaning

In this video, John Walton talks about ancient myth and how we might better understand it if we think about its intended functionality—that is, myths were a way to explain a culture’s origin and universal significance though they lacked the advances of scientific discovery.

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