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113 resources found (displaying 1-20)
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Series: “Origins” Book Club (6 entries)

 

Adam, Eve, and Human Population Genetics, Part 1: Scripture, science, and defining the issues

Does the human race all descend from two individuals? Genomic science says no, but it doesn’t rule out the possibility that Adam and Eve were still historic persons.

 

The “One Thing” Behind the Genesis Debate

The one thing on which the entire Genesis debate hinges is whether we acknowledge the role played by hermeneutics.

 

Saturday Science Links: November 8, 2014

In this week's edition, learn about amphibious dinosaurs, frozen bison mummies, and hummingbird combat.

 

Saturday Science Links: October 25, 2014

In science news this week, read about magical nose cells, 45,000 year old thigh bones, and the weirdest looking dinosaur ever.

 

God Decides, We Measure

The former chair of the Harvard University physics department muses on how faith gives meaning to his scientific work.

 

The Genesis Rock

The story of the Genesis Rock reminds us of how biblical and scientific accounts, despite their different purviews and purposes, remain inexorably linked in our understanding of origins.

 

Series: Evolution Basics (50 entries)

Written by BioLogos Fellow of Biology Dennis Venema, this series of posts is intended as a basic introduction to the science of evolution for non-specialists.

 

Series: Reviewing "Surprised by Scripture" by N.T. Wright (3 entries)

 

Origins News Round-up for September 30, 2014

Are black holes in trouble? Could life have come from space? What do we know about the religious lives of Indian scientists? Find the answers to these questions and more.

 

On Being Right or Wrong

“We should be slow to accuse another of discarding the authority of Scripture, and therefore denouncing them, just because they interpret Scripture differently than we do.”

 

Series: Fundamentalists, Modernists, and Evolution (6 entries)

 

Origins News Roundup for September 3, 2014

This week's news features volcanoes, skeletons, and stars, as well as a thought-provoking new book from InterVarsity press.

 

Origins News Roundup for August 20, 2014

From science and religion blogs: quantum uncertainty and God, the remarkable fact that we have come to understand our place in the created order, and the role of theology in making wise choices about the use of technology.

 

Who’s Afraid of Science?

Learning about science has taught me humility about my Bible reading and it has pushed me to think again, to read again, to ask again, and to wonder all over again what the Bible was saying when it was written and how the Bible was heard to its original hearers (so far as the evidence permits us to know such things).

 

Origins News Roundup for July 23, 2014

This week in origins news, a great collection of articles by key players in the conversation about theology and science, a surprising science fair discovery, and the Apollo 11 anniversary!

 

The Christian Reformed Church votes to support scholarship on human origins

We should celebrate the many times that our churches and colleges encourage scholarship. I saw several delegates at Synod stand up and speak directly about the importance of supporting scholars who engage the science and religion dialogue. The recent Synod decision was a move in the right direction.

 

How did God create the ingredients for life?

God could have created a fertile planet miraculously in an instant, but when we look carefully at the physical evidence, it appears that the earth has a longer history as part of the universe.

 

BioLogos Basics Video #4: How did God create the ingredients for life?

God could have created a fertile planet miraculously in an instant, but when we look carefully at the physical evidence, it appears that the earth has a longer history as part of the universe.

 

Series: The Human Fossil Record (19 entries)

In this series, James Kidder provides an intriguing study on transitional fossils and the evolutionary history of modern humans. He begins by discussing the fossil record, explaining how new forms are classified. He then explains the physically distinguishing trait of humankind—bipedalism. From the discovery of Ardipithecus, the earliest known hominin, to the australopithecines, the most prolific hominin, Kidder focuses on the discovery, the anatomy, and the interpretation of these ancestral remains.

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113 resources found (displaying 1-20)
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