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What’s in the Works at BioLogos

There is no formula for generating beliefs in people. There are plenty of people with access to the same facts who end up believing different things. But for many Christians—like the ones I heard from this week—access to information about the position we call “evolutionary creation” could make a significant difference for reconciling science and Christian faith.

 

Southern Baptist Voices: And in Conclusion . . .

My goal in leading this organization for these past three and a half years has been to lay the groundwork to help my fellow evangelicals see that the conflict between our faith and mainstream science is not as great as they thought it was. In the process, my thinking has been significantly shaped by listening to people who think differently than I do

 

Conversations in Creation

Since the BioLogos/Highway Media collaboration From the Dust made its worldwide debut this year, we’ve been excited to hear how others have been using the film to jump start their own conversations with fellow Christians about science and faith .

 

Gracious Dialogue

Our desire to engage in gracious dialogue with fellow believers who reject biological evolution has been receiving increased attention in both the Christian and secular press. More importantly, we are being joined in this reconciling project by our brothers and sisters in Christ who have often been defined primarily as our “opponents”.

 

The Vision Lives On . . . and On

I cannot overstate the joy and privilege of leading an organization that— from the beginning—was so uniquely poised to help the conservative church in its process of coming to peace with science in general, and evolutionary biology, in particular.

 

Holding Together: Teaching and Worshipping Through Genesis in the Local Church

Our little community of faith in California has never been one to shy away from the critical cultural questions that come up daily in the life of the Christ-follower.

 

Vision for Change: Evolution & Christian Faith Grants Program

We at BioLogos are convinced that the Bible is the Word of God and that God has created through a gradual, evolutionary process, but we don’t have all of the answers. Therefore, we've launched a program to address theological and philosophical questions commonly voiced by Christians.

 

Series: Thinking Aloud Together (4 entries)

This series by Scot McKnight relates a lecture given at the 2012 BioLogos workshop for Evangelical theologians, scientists, authors and pastors. He explains that evolution is taught in public schools, and therefore must be addressed by Evangelical pastors in the churches as well. This will educate a whole generation of upcoming scientists on the issues of science and faith. Overall, he encourages scientists and pastors to collaborate on the issue as they rethink the long held interpretations of Genesis 1-3.

 

Teaching the Whole Controversy

Part of our goal at BioLogos is to demonstrate that we in the Christian community can and must think deeply, but also broadly, if we want to do justice to the complexity of biological life, but also to the complexity of our lives of faith.

 

Why should Christians consider evolutionary creation?

Because evolution is a challenging subject, many Christians are tempted to simply ignore or reject it. Yet considering evolutionary creation has important benefits for Christians both in our relationship with the Creator, and with our relationships with other people—believers and non-Christians alike. First, Christians should study evolution because (like all the natural sciences) it is the study of God’s creation. Creation itself is a complementary revelation to what is communicated in the Scriptures, and through it God shows how and when he brought about life, to his honor and glory. Studying the creation is also an invitation into a deeper understanding of the attributes and character of Father, Son and Spirit. Second, considering evolutionary creation aids the Church in its gospel mission, supporting young Christians in their faith, helping answer critics, and equipping us to engage effectively in the wider culture. An anti-evolution attitude can harm Christian young people by presenting them with a false choice between pursuing science OR holding to faith. Similarly, a hostile attitude towards evolution can hinder evangelism when seekers hear that they must reject science to follow Christ. On the other hand, studying evolution as a God-ordained process helps Christians refute arguments that science encourages an atheistic worldview. Furthermore, as the church engages front-page issues raised by the rapid growth in science, medicine, and technology, a Christ-centered voice in such areas as bioethics will be stronger if based on a thorough understanding of the natural sciences, including evolution.

(Updated on September 9, 2012)

 

Southern Baptist Voices: An Ongoing Series

This week, we take that commitment to engage in charitable dialogue with those who disagree with us by posting the first of several essays from Southern Baptist scholars, along with our responses to their concerns and arguments—a series we are calling Southern Baptist Voices.

 

BioLoguration II

We want to cultivate a world where Christian young people feel emboldened in their faith—rather than weakened—when they come to understand the strength of the scientific data.

 

Christians Care about Science and Theology

Here are ten reasons Christians should care deeply about issues emerging from the science-and-theology interface.

 

Authority in an Interdisciplinary Setting

I have described my professional experience as a rather extended analogy to the BioLogos project. By its very nature, BioLogos is interdisciplinary, intended to bring together at least two fields often considered to be entirely incompatible.

 

Series: Francis Collins and Karl Giberson Interview (7 entries)

In this six part series, Karl Giberson discusses evolution with BioLogos founder Francis Collins as it relates to the scientific community and the church. Their conversation addresses Collins’ scientific perspectives, his Christian faith, and the abundant evidence for evolution. Throughout, the two critique various unscientific approaches to evolution such as Young Earth Creationism and Intelligent Design. Overall, they both express the deep need for the Church in America to accept evolution as a valuable, true theory as well as to cultivate a richer understanding of the Bible among the people.

 

The BioLogos Foundation’s Theology of Celebration II Workshop

On November 9-11, 2010, a group of pastors, church leaders, scholars, scientists, and laypersons met in New York City for the second Theology of Celebration BioLogos Workshop. There was extensive discussion around the following three themes.

 

The Dawning of a New Day

BioLogos and its impact on the evangelical scene was one of the top ten stories of 2010 as judged by both Christianity Today and The Gospel Coalition. This is good, I suppose. However, we have barely begun to deal with the issues in a substantive manner.

 

The Vision Lives On

BioLogos has remained alive and is thriving. By the time this article was written, 239,000 unique individuals had visited the site.

 

Series: “I am the Lord of the Dance,” said He (2 entries)

In this brief series, Darrel Falk first responds to an article written by Jerry Coyne that criticized BioLogos’ decision to attend the Vibrant Dance of Faith and Science conference in 2010. He explains that the Church is one Body. Appropriately, the event coordinators called for a spirit of unity, and BioLogos wished to establish meaningful relations with other leaders in Christian circles “that think differently” about the creation process. In the second part, Falk summarizes the set-up and outcome of the event while also explaining his reasons for declining to speak with Steve Meyer publically at the event.

 

On Putting Our Hands to the Plow and Not Looking Back

BioLogos, unless we are careful, could evolve into a place for armchair philosophy.

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