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God as Process Engineer: Creator, Sustainer, Reedemer, and Provider

From a Judeo-Christian perspective, all of these curiosities dovetail into a profoundly meaningful explanation: Being made in God’s image helps to explain our creative and investigative skills, particularly when we consider that God has specially engineered this universe to reveal himself to human beings.

 

Series: Excerpts from “Evolving: Evangelicals Reflect on Evolution” (13 entries)

We need to hear stories from others who have wrestled with evolution and Christian faith. What arguments made them change their views on science? How did they hold fast to their relationship with God? The essays in this series will eventually comprise a book, provisionally titled, “Evolving: Evangelicals Reflect on Evolution.”

 

Series: On Creating the Cosmos, by Ted Peters (9 entries)

Last year I introduced readers to one of the leading voices about Christianity and science, John Polkinghorne. I also helped BioLogos bring in another leading voice, Robert Russell. This new series introduces a third prominent Christian thinker, Lutheran theologian Ted Peters, Research Professor Emeritus in Systematic Theology and Ethics at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary, the Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences (http://www.ctns.org/), and the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California.

 

Series: Belief in God in a World Explained by Science (3 entries)

 

Evolution Basics: At the Frontiers of Evolution, Part 2: Abiogenesis and the Question of Naturalism

But Dennis, you might say, aren’t you assuming that life had a “natural” origin? Aren’t you discounting the possibility that God might have brought life about through supernatural means? Haven’t you capitulated to “naturalism” from the outset?

 

Origins News Roundup for July 9, 2014

This week in origins news is a rousing medley of articles about science and faith, from multiple angles. Some classics on science, religion, and the classroom along with some probing into where atheists come from, new resources from John Polkinghorne, and an off-the-beaten-path blog post.

 

Creation for Kids

Children’s books are more than stories. They can become familiar narratives children listen to over and over. So it’s worth asking - Are the books we’re reading doing a good job of portraying God and His Creation?

 

Religion, Science, and Society

Conflicts occur when people argue one worldview against another. They may be arguing Atheism versus Monotheism, then pull out science as a weapon saying, "science proves I'm right because of this or that..." In my view, science is rather more limited than this. Science has a lot of interesting resonances with the big questions, and can inform them, but I don’t believe it can answer them.

 

Series: Creation, Evolution, and the Over-Active Imagination (2 entries)

 

The Strange Tension Between Theology and Science

The problem comes when materialism, claiming the authority of science, denies the possibility of all other types of knowledge — reducing human beings to a bag of chemicals and all their hopes and loves to the firing of neurons. Or when religion exceeds its bounds and declares the Earth to be 6,000 years old. In both cases, the besetting sin is the same: the arrogant exclusive claim to know reality.

 

An Impossible World

What if political, social, religious, and scientific groups the world over adopted [a gracious] approach to dialogue and their own desires? What if we didn’t have to be snide and aggressive to get our point across and to elicit cheering (or jeering) from our respective constituencies?

 

Intelligent Design and Common Ancestry, Part 3

If the designer was able to make fruit fly genomes that distinct, why was it not possible to achieve the same distinction between humans and chimpanzees? Humans and chimpanzees are more divergent in behavior and diet than fruit flies are, so if anything their genomes should be more distinct from each other if one were to appeal to a “common design” type argument.

 

Series: “The Language of God” Book Club (7 entries)

The BioLogos Book Club discussion of Francis Collins’ The Language of God.

 

Book review: “Why Science Does Not Disprove God” by Amir D. Aczel

Thus, no matter what scientific evidence is amassed to explain the architecture of atoms, or the ways that neurons exchange chemical and electrical signals to create the sensations in our minds, or the manner in which the universe may have been born out of the quantum foam, science cannot disprove the existence of God — any more than a fish can disprove the existence of trees.

 

Reflections on Tyson’s Cosmos, Episode 1

Carl’s dramatic lines that opened his Cosmos were repeated in Cosmos II: “The universe is all there is, or was, or ever will be.” When I told Haines Stiles that many people took that as a statement of atheism, he responded with surprise. “Really?” he said. “We just put that in because it sounded poetic!”

 

John Ortberg Sermon: Does Science Disprove Faith?

All of you who do science, all of you who teach or research or you’re involved in engineering or medicine or education, or biology or chemistry or physics—you are doing a noble thing. You are thinking God’s thoughts after him. … You are obeying God’s command given way back in Genesis to exercise dominion, to learn about, to be curious and discover and steward the earth.

 

Series: Why Do We Have This Problem In The First Place?: Evolution, Creation, and Divine Hiddenness (2 entries)

 

Origins News Roundup for Friday, February 28, 2014

Ever wonder what a huge frozen lake looks like from space? Or what the best blunders in science history have been? Closer to home (for us anyway), have you contemplated whether America’s views on evolution will ever change? Today’s News Roundup brings you a mashup of thoughtful essays and some fun items to make your Friday more interesting.

 

Rethinking the Origins Debate

Even among the majority [of Americans] who believe that God created humans, the chasm separating creationist and evolutionist views appears to be gargantuan. Are Americans really this divided over human origins? As a social scientist, I am skeptical about these findings.

 

Origins News Round-up for Friday, February 14, 2014

Read today’s News Roundup for BioLogos-curated collection of articles analyzing and commenting on last week’s debate between Bill Nye and Ken Ham—as well as some Valentine’s Day amusements.

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