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The Extended Synthesis (Reviewing “Darwin’s Doubt”: Robert Bishop, Part 1)

Many evolutionary and developmental biologists are pursuing an extended synthesis involving population genetics, developmental biology, epigenetics and other recent developments. Yet Stephen Meyer presents their published research as offering an alternative to or replacement for neo-Darwinian evolution.

 

Series: Fundamentalists, Modernists, and Evolution (3 entries)

 

Series: Evolution Basics (46 entries)

Written by BioLogos Fellow of Biology Dennis Venema, this series of posts is intended as a basic introduction to the science of evolution for non-specialists.

 

Origins News Roundup for August 6, 2014

News about the Ebola outbreak and initiatives in genomic medicine lead our news roundup this week, with a collection of research and learning opportunities in biology and at the science/faith border to follow.

 

Not So Dry Bones: An interview with Mary Schweitzer

We don’t have all the answers and never will. And when God says that he is revealed in his creation, I think that means we need to take care of what we have and understand where we came from. The more I understand how things work, the bigger God gets. When he was just a magician pulling things out of a hat, that doesn’t even compare to how I see him now!

 

Series: Belief in God in a World Explained by Science (3 entries)

 

Series: The Human Fossil Record (19 entries)

In this series, James Kidder provides an intriguing study on transitional fossils and the evolutionary history of modern humans. He begins by discussing the fossil record, explaining how new forms are classified. He then explains the physically distinguishing trait of humankind—bipedalism. From the discovery of Ardipithecus, the earliest known hominin, to the australopithecines, the most prolific hominin, Kidder focuses on the discovery, the anatomy, and the interpretation of these ancestral remains.

 

Religion, Science, and Society

Conflicts occur when people argue one worldview against another. They may be arguing Atheism versus Monotheism, then pull out science as a weapon saying, "science proves I'm right because of this or that..." In my view, science is rather more limited than this. Science has a lot of interesting resonances with the big questions, and can inform them, but I don’t believe it can answer them.

 

Human Evolution: Genes, Genealogies and Phylogenies

When read in this way, the Genesis stories may be seen as one of the greatest-ever revolutions in human understanding. Genesis used the literary forms of the day to introduce its readers to a rational God who cares for people – and whose faithfulness made science possible. Genesis is expressly about theology, not science.

 

Series: Intelligent Design and Common Ancestry (4 entries)

Would those genuinely interested in learning about evolution benefit from a careful explanation of why these common objections don’t hold water? Here the answer seemed to me to be “yes.”

 

Nazarenes on Evolution

The Nazarenes Exploring Evolution poll of religion scholars reveals that most scholars in science, Bible, and theology are open to the possibility that Christian faith is compatible with the idea that God creates through evolution.

 

Series: Excerpts from “Evolving: Evangelicals Reflect on Evolution” (13 entries)

We need to hear stories from others who have wrestled with evolution and Christian faith. What arguments made them change their views on science? How did they hold fast to their relationship with God? The essays in this series will eventually comprise a book, provisionally titled, “Evolving: Evangelicals Reflect on Evolution.”

 

Series: “The Language of God” Book Club (7 entries)

The BioLogos Book Club discussion of Francis Collins’ The Language of God.

 

Series: Pasteur vs. Pouchet and the Demise of Spontaneous Generation: Lessons for Today from an Old Controversy (2 entries)

 

Series: Science and Christianity: A Positive International Dialogue (2 entries)

There is often a worry that working in or studying science is a threat to faith, but stories of scientists who are Christians in the top ranks of academia show that this is not the case.

 

On Creating the Cosmos

“I believe that we must now ask for more than simple avoidance of cognitive dissonance. I believe we should seek for cognitive consonance.”

 

Reflections on Tyson’s Cosmos, Episode 1

Carl’s dramatic lines that opened his Cosmos were repeated in Cosmos II: “The universe is all there is, or was, or ever will be.” When I told Haines Stiles that many people took that as a statement of atheism, he responded with surprise. “Really?” he said. “We just put that in because it sounded poetic!”

 

Origins News Roundup for March 14, 2014

This week in Origins news, a few different takes on the new COSMOS series on Fox, some intriguing discoveries and theories about dinosaurs, and a smattering of articles supporting women in science—who are often an underrepresented group in STEM fields.

 

Series: The Faith of a Great Scientist: Robert Boyle’s Religious Life, Attitudes, and Vocation (13 entries)

A deep love for scripture, coupled (ironically) with a lifelong struggle with religious doubt, led Robert Boyle to write several important books relating scientific and religious knowledge. We explore aspects of this fascinating interaction.

 

Series: The Body of Christ in Science (2 entries)

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191 resources found (displaying 1-20)
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