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25 resources found (displaying 1-20)
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Series: Science and the Bible (22 entries)

This ongoing series written by historian Ted Davis begins with a brief synopsis of his personal background, and then goes on to reveal his passion for debunking “the now-common view that the history of science and Christianity is one of ongoing, inevitable conflict.”

 

Series: Asa Gray and Charles Darwin Discuss Evolution and Design (5 entries)

Many Christians believe that they face a painful choice-- either life was designed by God or it is an evolutionary product of natural selection. Charles Darwin himself believed in this dichotomy, and people ever since have felt the need to "choose sides". However, looking back at history, we find that one of Darwin's chief scientific colleagues, Asa Gray, did not share this perspective. In this three-part essay, part 1 charts the relationship of Asa Gray and Charles Darwin. Part 2 describes Darwin's struggle with the problem of natural evil and design in nature, and part 3 explores how Asa Gray was able to embrace evolution without rejecting the idea of design.

 

Fine-tuning and the “Fruitful Universe”

I ask the question, “Why is the universe so special?” Now scientists don’t like things to be special; we like things to be general, and our natural anticipation would have been that the universe is just a common specimen of what a universe might be like.

 

Understanding Evolution: The Evolutionary Origins of Irreducible Complexity, Part 1

I will take some time to clarify exactly how Michael Behe, the biochemist and Intelligent Design (ID) proponent who has most extensively developed the "irreducible complexity" argument, uses the term.

 

On Deciphering the Signature

The interesting thing about this is that Steve Meyer and I are probably really in almost the same exact position when it comes to our core beliefs. We differ primarily in one regard.

 

Series: From ID to BioLogos (8 entries)

In this series, Dennis Venema describes his personal journey that took him away from the Intelligent Design arguments toward the evolutionary creation worldview. Through careful and honest research, he discovered ID scientific reasoning to be analogy-based, in sharp contrast to evolutionary science, which was supported by concrete data. After accepting this view, God’s presence ever strengthened him as he explored the compatibility between the Bible and God’s creative mechanism.

 

Series: C.S. Lewis on Evolution and Intelligent Design (8 entries)

This in-depth series by Michael L. Peterson surveys author and apologist C.S. Lewis, reflecting on his arguments for the existence of God as well as his views on Intelligent Design and evolution. Peterson first explains the classical lines of rationale and then discusses Lewis’ Transcendent Intelligence argument. He clearly distinguishes Lewis’ view, however, from other design arguments. As he concludes, he relates Lewis’ thoughts on the firmly grounded theory of evolution, presenting his grand Trinitarian worldview which included this scientific view of the universe.

 

The Crutch

Providing the crutch for non-believers to lean on is a well-intentioned strategic error that has no benefit and likely does much harm. However, I am even more concerned about something else related to our construction of these crutches.

 

Series: Design in Nature (6 entries)

In this series, Oliver R. Barclay examines the idea of God as Designer. He concludes that God did indeed design creation, and that the “state of the world is evidence not only for the existence and power of God but for his kindness and care for his creation.” Barclay then goes on to investigate the arguments for Intelligent Design which attempt to prove that certain examples of design necessarily imply direct intervention by a Great Designer. He points the flaws of such an argument and discusses its implications.

 

Series: Evolution and the Origin of Biological Information (7 entries)

Dennis Venema begins this series by summarizing a key Intelligent Design belief: that if we see specified information, we infer design because we are unaware of a mechanism that can bring about specified information in the absence of intelligence. In each subsequent part of the series, Venema shows why this argument is wrong. Venema presents evidence to show that natural mechanisms can, in fact, explain the origin of new information. He reminds his readers, however, that this does not in any manner exclude God from the process.

 

Series: John Polkinghorne on Natural Theology (5 entries)

Polkinghorne discusses the origins and aims of natural theology in this series. It does not offer truth, but rather a “best explanation” for the world, answering primarily meta-questions. Two such questions asked by Polkinghorne are, “Why is science possible at all?” and “What makes the universe so special?” To explore the answers, he looks at the ability of human minds to penetrate mysteries of the natural world as well as the fine-tuning of the universe necessary to produce the fruitfulness of life.

 

Series: Why Dembski’s Design Inference Doesn’t Work (3 entries)

In this two part series, James Bradley exposes a argument made in the book Design Inference , which was written by Intelligent Design proponent William Dembski. To accomplish this, he carefully examines Dembski’s “explanatory filter” that predicts whether an event occurred by regularity, chance, or design, and exposes its “fatal flaws.”

 

Series: Bacterial Flagellum (3 entries)

In this three part series, Kathryn Applegate explores the structure and operation of the bacterial flagellum which is often described in depth by ID proponents. Although it is an extraordinary natural machine, ID supporters speak about it in misleading ways that suggest special intervention over evolution. However, she explains that self-assembly is an outcome of natural laws that direct life.

 

The Agency Assumption: Why Do We Look for Intelligence in the Unknown?

It’s difficult to describe, but something irregular in the audio signal got me thinking that the noise was being generated by a critter! Once I made the mental connection to deliberate conscious activity, I easily imagined that a rat was chewing a hole in something.

 

Defining ID

The topic of Intelligent Design (ID) comes up frequently here. Because ID can be hard to pin down, it’s worth pausing to remind ourselves what we’re talking about when we use the term on this site.

 

Francisco Ayala Responds to "Signature of Controversy"

It is almost one year since Signature in the Cell by Stephen Meyer was released. The book now has 245 reviews on Amazon and was on Amazon’s 2009 best seller list for science books. One year later, it still remains in the top 3,000 overall. By many accounts, this is a highly successful book.

 

Ard Louis on Intelligent Design

In this short video, physicist Ard Louis expresses some doubts about Intelligent Design, noting that his primary resistance to the movement is based on theological grounds rather than science.

 

Through a Glass Darkly

BioLogos enthusiastically endorses the idea that the universe is intelligently designed and we certainly believe that the creator of the universe is intelligent. I want to acknowledge the real similarities between fine-tuning arguments and arguments made by ID.

 

Series: Intelligent Design and Me (4 entries)

In this two part series, philosopher Francis Beckwith offers a brief history of the ID movement and discusses his intellectual journey alongside of it.

 

Response to Darrel Falk’s Review of "Signature in the Cell"

In late December, Darrel Falk sent a copy of his overview of Signature in the Cell to Stephen C. Meyer, the book's author, and asked for a reply. Today, we are happy to post Dr. Meyer’s unedited response.

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