Questions Categorized as "Scripture Interpretation"

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What factors should be considered in determining how to approach a passage of scripture?

Finding the best interpretation of a scripture passage can be a daunting task.  C.S. Lewis advises us to “Look. Listen. Receive.”  A good approach is to seek the intended meaning for the original audience before considering what it means for us today.  Clues to the original intended meaning can be found in the style of language, the genre of literature, the original audience, and the historical and cultural context.  By studying these things, we avoid projecting modern ideas (like science) onto the text.

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How was the Genesis account of creation interpreted before Darwin?

Given the stark difference between evolution and six-day creation, many people assume that Darwin’s theory shook the foundations of the Christian faith. In truth, the literal six-day interpretation of Genesis 1-2 was not the only perspective held by Christians prior to modern science.  St. Augustine (354-430), John Calvin (1509-1564), John Wesley (1703-171), and others supported the idea of Accommodation.  In the Accommodation view, Genesis 1-2 was written in a simple allegorical fashion to make it easy for people of that time to understand.  In fact, Augustine suggested that the 6 days of Genesis 1 describe a single day of creation.  St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) argued that God did not create things in their final state, but created them to have potential to develop as he intended.  The views of these and other Christian leaders are consistent with God creating life by means of evolution.

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How have Christians responded to Darwin’s “Origin of Species”?

Even before Darwin published The Origin of Species in 1859, many Christians had already accepted an old Earth.  One of the first supporters of evolutionary science in America—Harvard biologist Asa Gray—was a devout Christian.  Conservative theologian B. B. Warfield also accepted the science of evolution, and both he and Asa Gray rejected the idea that evolution leads to atheism.  Even the authors of The Fundamentals, published between 1910 and 1915, accepted an old earth.  It wasn’t until a century after Darwin that a large number of evangelicals and fundamentalists began to accept the combination of flood geology and 6-day creation promoted by Seventh-day Adventists.

(Updated on July 10, 2012)

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What do Biblical scholars today say about Genesis 1-2?

In recent decades, evangelical Biblical scholars have reconsidered non-literal interpretations of Genesis.  The Accommodation view of St. Augustine and John Calvin is supported by recent discoveries about ancient cultures.  Literature from these cultures shows interesting parallels and differences with Genesis accounts.  The differences are striking, such as stories where creation is a battle among many gods rather than the acts of one sovereign Creator.  The similarities, however, show how God accommodated his message so that the Israelites could understand it.  For example, the Egyptians and Babylonians thought the sky was a solid dome.  This solid dome appears in Genesis 1 as the firmament created on day 2.  God did not try to correct the “science” of the Israelites by explaining that the sky was a gaseous atmosphere.  Instead, God accommodated his message to their cultural context.  Many evangelical Biblical scholars have concluded that Genesis is not meant to teach scientific information.

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How should we interpret the Genesis flood account?

Genesis 6-9 tells the fascinating story of Noah, the Ark, and the Flood. Some Christians interpret the text to mean that the biblical flood must have covered the entire globe.  They also work to explain the evidence in rocks and fossils in terms of this world-wide flood.  Other Christians do not feel the text requires that the flood be global, but could have covered the small region of earth known to Noah.  The scientific and historical evidence does not support a global flood, but is consistent with a catastrophic regional flood.  Beyond its place in history, the Genesis flood teaches us about human depravity, faith, obedience, divine judgment, grace and mercy.

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