The Same Life

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September 26, 2010 Tags: Christianity & Science - Then and Now

Today's entry was written by the BioLogos Editorial Team. You can read more about what we believe here.

The seas teem with countless beautiful and wonderful creatures, from the silvery schools of fish that dart through the waters and the mysterious jellyfish who float silently through the deep, to the forest of brightly colored coral that provide a home for many. To what can we attribute such beauty? On the one hand, the seas represent perfect examples of the work of a divine creator. On the other, these creatures are the representation of evolution in action.

Do these two perspectives conflict? Not at all. As French philosopher and Jesuit priest Pierre Teilhard de Chardin wrote:

"After close on two centuries of passionate struggles, neither science nor faith has succeeded in discrediting its adversary. On the contrary, it becomes obvious that neither can develop normally without the other. And the reason is simple: the same life animates both. Neither in its impetus nor in its achievement can science go to its limits without becoming tinged with mysticism and charged with faith."

- The Phenomenon of Man
(quote taken from The Hand of God)

For more worship videos like the one shown above, be sure to visit Highway Video's website.



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sy - #32072

September 26th 2010

This lovely video makes me think of something. I have just finished reading the new Hawking book, in whch he claims to answer the question “why is there something, instead of nothing?” He doesn’t.
But perhaps an equally interesting question, though far more complex is “why is the universe so beautiful?”


Roger A. Sawtelle - #32202

September 27th 2010

Which is more important, evolution or ecology?  I’ll take ecology, especially since Darwin described evolution as the War of Nature.  Since when is war beautiful?


beaglelady - #32217

September 27th 2010

Which is more important, evolution or ecology?  I’ll take ecology, especially since Darwin described evolution as the War of Nature.  Since when is war beautiful?

Unfortunately, the evolutionary arms race is reality, plain and simple. 

Bed bugs bite back thanks to evolution.

It is feared that these resistant bedbugs will be heading in droves to other cities soon.  Only the exterminators are smiling.  The natural world is what it is. As Karl Giberson said in a recent post,  “Mother Nature casts the only vote and it is the job of science to determine how she voted. “


Roger A. Sawtelle - #32273

September 27th 2010

Beaglelady,

Bedbugs would probably exist only if there were people to feed on.  They do not exist in an evolutionary vacuum, but in an ecological niche.


beaglelady - #32277

September 27th 2010

Bedbugs would probably exist only if there were people to feed on.

Bedbugs can also feed on the blood of animals. We do have our own unique parasites, that evolved from other varieties.  As a matter of fact, BioLogos, in the news section, had an article about human lice

My point remains: The evolutionary arms race is reality, plain and simple.  The natural world is what it is. As Karl Giberson said in a recent post,  “Mother Nature casts the only vote and it is the job of science to determine how she voted.”


Roger A. Sawtelle - #32330

September 28th 2010

The point is that evolution does not take place in a vacuum.  I for one do not want bedbugs in my bed, but I am not out to destroy them all.  If you want to share your bed with them and they can live on other animals that is fine with me.

To paraphrase Ecclesiastes every creature, including humans, has its own time and place or niche.  I do not want to share my niche with bedbugs, but will if I must.  An arms race has little to do with it.  More important is how successfully each creature adapts to its environment and the most successful way as science has clearly demonstrated is by working together.


Roger A. Sawtelle - #32354

September 28th 2010

Beagle Lady,

I just read an interesting article on the ecological evolution of the coyote that you might enjoy.  What is perticularly interesting is how coyotes and badgers team up to hunt moles.

I found it online in the Sept 27th edition of the NY Times.


beaglelady - #32398

September 28th 2010

The point is that evolution does not take place in a vacuum.

Nobody is saying that it does.

To paraphrase Ecclesiastes every creature, including humans, has its own time and place or niche.  I do not want to share my niche with bedbugs, but will if I must.  An arms race has little to do with it.

It has everything to do with it.

 

btw, Jimmy Carter’s foundation (The Carter Foundation) is trying to   eliminate the guinea worm, a nightmarish scourge of mankind.  You can read about it here.  Do you approve of the program to eliminate it?


Roger A. Sawtelle - #32412

September 28th 2010

Beagle Lady,

I think that you misunderstood what the Carter Foundation is trying to do.  It is working to eradicate the disease, not the worm.  The way to do this is fairly simple.  One, do not drink unfiltered water, and Two, stay out of the water if you have the parasitic infection. 

The treatment is simple also, but painful, remove the worms. 

Prevention is always the best way to overcome a disease.  Prevention and treatment are needed here.  I do not see any reference to eradicating the worm itself.

I hope that you were able to find the article on the coyote.  It is much more entertaining than the guinea worm, although I commend the Carter Foundation for it good work and pray that Pres. Carter recovers from his health problem today.


beaglelady - #32425

September 28th 2010

Roger,

What do think happens to the guinea worm if it has no host to feed on?


sy - #32438

September 28th 2010

Darwin found nature to be beautiful, even when, and especially when the process of evolution is taken into account. I hate human war, but the process of evolution is not like human war. That is a false interpretation of a scientifically defined process, which includes ecological cooperation, as well as competition, and adaptation. The beauty of the universe is found in its diversity, which is a direct result of the evolutionary process. There is indeed grandeur in this view of life. Lets not forget those words.


beaglelady - #32440

September 28th 2010

It would be fair to say that there is both incredible beauty and terrible suffering in the natural world.  It is what it is.


conrad - #32445

September 28th 2010

Is it as bad for a guinea worm to starve as it is for a stray pooch?
I ask that question to get to a larger point.

Are we only concerned about vertebrates?

Why not a humane society for protection noxious vermin?

I am reminded of Eliza’s father in My Fair Lady.
He remonstrated with professor Doolittle about his prejudice against the “undeserving poor”.
He said everyone worried about the “deserving poor” while the undeserving poor had equal needs AND GREATER THIRSTS!

So,.... DOES NO ONE HERE CARE ABOUT THE POOR GUINEA WORM?
Have we all become callous xenophobic seekers of success ONLY for our own kind?

Take a guinea worm to lunch some day.
And buy him a drink.


Roger A. Sawtelle - #32520

September 29th 2010

Beagle Lady,

As you said the bed bug does not depend only on human hosts.  If you read the article carefully, the guinea worm problem is a relatively new problem at least for that part of Africa.  It must have come from somewhere just as the HIV virus lived in monkeys or apes before it became a deadly human pandemic.  Types of flu live in birds and swine before they jump to humans and create problems.

Again every life form has its niche.  Problems are created when it escapes it niche and invades other areas not accustomed to it, that is an invasive species.  When germs and parasites adapt to us, we must adapt to them.


Roger A. Sawtelle - #32560

September 29th 2010

Beagle Lady,

Suffering is terrible only if it has no purpose.  Nature uses suffering and death to sustain and renew life.

Humans are the only ones who create needless and useless suffering and death.


beaglelady - #32581

September 30th 2010

Again every life form has its niche.  Problems are created when it escapes it niche and invades other areas not accustomed to it, that is an invasive species.

No an existing problem becomes a bigger problem. Or even a global problem.

 

If you read the article carefully, the guinea worm problem is a relatively new problem at least for that part of Africa.

The guinea worm is an ancient scourge.

Suffering is terrible only if it has no purpose.  Nature uses suffering and death to sustain and renew life.  Humans are the only ones who create needless and useless suffering and death.

I don’t know about that.  Suffering usually is terrible, period.  Nature by itself isn’t trying to do anything.  There is more than enough needless and useless suffering even without human agency. 


Warning: the following is graphic!
Worms “N” Us (A look at 8 parasitic worms that live in humans)


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