The Earth is Full of Your Creatures

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March 28, 2010 Tags: History of Life

Today's entry was written by the BioLogos Editorial Team. You can read more about what we believe here.

"How many are your works, O Lord! In wisdom you made them all; the earth is full of your creatures. There is the sea, vast and spacious, teeming with creatures beyond number—living things both large and small. " - Psalms 104:24

Even in the depths of the ocean, the beauty of God's creation shines through. The seas teem with countless amazing and wonderful creatures, from silvery schools of fish that dart through the waters, to mysterious jellyfish which float silently through the deep, to reefs of brightly colored coral that provide a home for many.

Our exploration of creation continues to reveal new wonders and surprises. In the video above, oceanographer David Gallo notes that in the deepest parts of the ocean, where we might expect to find no life at all, we have found more life and diversity than even the tropical rainforest. Gallo also presents footage of sea creatures which have evolved astounding adaptations to match their unique environments.

As we continue to explore the vast and varied world around us, the words of the Psalmist ring especially true:

“O Lord, our Lord, how majestic is your name in all the earth!” – Psalm 8:9



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Karl A - #7929

March 28th 2010

Amazing video!  It is certainly inspiring of worship, and the Psalm quote was perfect.

All Christians, whether of YEC, OEC, ID, or EC/TE persuasion, can agree that our God has allowed us to live in an amazing world.


Charlie - #7983

March 29th 2010

It’s always fun to see new animals and their special adaptations, but this diversity, and mainly the similarities we all hold with such diversity, really just supports common descent.  It neither supports or refutes a creator, so making any connection to religion is off scope.

P.S. I liked seeing “Intelligent Design” flash up at the beginning of the powerpoint presentation.  Is Biologos taking an ID presentation and putting it on their site?


DWDMD - #8010

March 29th 2010

” It’s always fun to see new animals and their special adaptations, but this diversity, and mainly the similarities we all hold with such diversity, really just supports common descent.  It neither supports or refutes a creator, so making any connection to religion is off scope.”

some comments below, not meant to be a coherent argument…

I agree that showing organisms with adaptation to extreme environments simply shows adaptive radiation and does not in itself make a spiritual connection. How about our wonder and sense of awe at the diversity of these creatures though? What is the utility of that? I know evolutionary psychologists such as Dr. E.O. Wilson have postulated how our spiritural and aesthetic natures may have arisen because of adaptive advantage through processes of cultural evolution, but my own “argument from incredulity” finds that hard to swallow.
see below


DWDMD - #8011

March 29th 2010

continued

However, even if a very specific brain process for these most human of characteristics can eventually be pinpointed, and even reproduced in the lab, I don’t think that reduces our humanity to a mere survival machine or makes the existence of God untrue. Why do we need to be afraid of anything science finds out, unless our faith in God is based on some kind of “god-of-the-gaps” basis? We need to be very afraid, that is cautious and wisdom-seeking, about uses of scientific knowledge about the physical world, of course, but not fearful that we can discover anything as human beings that will negate the existence of the One who creates and gives meaning to our world and our lives.


Maurizio - #8018

March 29th 2010

Watching this and the current “Life” series on Discovery right now brings tears to my eyes.

I was openly weeping last night watching “Life” last night and seeing how other mammals tend to their young.

I agree with Karl. God is amazing. Now words can describe his beauty and majesty….


Maurizio - #8019

March 29th 2010

I meant “No” words can truly describe his beauty and majesty!


Charlie - #8057

March 30th 2010

DWDMD,

It’s also interesting what we find amazing.  We see mammals as pretty normal (relative to these cephalopods) because we are mammals.  Yet we have adapted as well, just different adaptations.  I think the ability to produce milk is a huge adaptation that might look very odd from an outsiders point of view.


DWDMD - #8101

March 30th 2010

Yes, good example. And BTW, some of us look pretty strange (like me) even to our own kind!
Charlie, what do you think about our sense of wonder and evolutionary explanations for it? Why do we appreciate diversity and have appreciation for things so “other” than ourselves (which I think are “goods”)? I believe it is our response to the Creator, but pure physicalists would try to find some way our spiritual and esthetic senses have developed as a positive adaptation or a by-product of another positive adaptation.  Even if this were true, which it may be, I still see it as occurring within God’s overall plan for thinking creatures to develop who could have fellowship with him.


Charlie - #8123

March 31st 2010

DWDMD,

The short answer is we just don’t know.  But I’d like to think it’s simply that the human being has a drive to learn.  There is definately an evolutionary explanation for mammals learning from others.  If we are to learn something or experience something new (and we enjoy it), we will learn more and evolutionarily speaking, that is an advantage to adaptation.  But then again, that’s just a hypothesis.


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