Southern Baptist Voices: An Ongoing Series

Bookmark and Share

February 27, 2012 Tags: Christian Unity

Today's entry was written by Darrel Falk and Mark Sprinkle. Please note the views expressed here are those of the author, not necessarily of The BioLogos Foundation. You can read more about what we believe here.

Southern Baptist Voices: An Ongoing Series

Note: You can read all the posts in this ongoing series on our Southern Baptist Voices landing page.

From BioLogos President Darrel Falk and Senior Web Editor, Mark Sprinkle

Most daily posts on the BioLogos Forum begin with the observation that we are “pleased to feature essays from various guest voices in the science-and-religion dialogue,” even when the views expressed are not those of The BioLogos Foundation. This week, we take that commitment to engage in charitable dialogue with those who disagree with us in a new direction by posting the first of several essays from Southern Baptist scholars along with our responses to their concerns and arguments—a series we are calling Southern Baptist Voices.

This series came out of conversations one of us (DF) had some time ago with Dr. Kenneth Keathley, Senior Vice President for Academic Administration of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, when we met at a conference. We talked about BioLogos and he expressed some concerns about the BioLogos point of view. As the conversation continued, Ken summarized our differences and the very important things we have in common with an equally gracious spirit. With that in mind, we asked him if he would arrange for several contributions from fellow Southern Baptist seminarians to address the concerns that he and his colleagues have about the BioLogos view of scripture, theology, and biology. We suggested that various BioLogos staff members or associates could respond in turn to each of those concerns and we agreed that the discussion would take place in the context of mutual respect as followers of Jesus. Nothing would be posted unless it had received the approval of each of us, together.

Tomorrow we begin our Southern Baptist Voices series with part 1 of an essay from Dr. Keathley, outlining the first three of six areas of his own concern. Part 2 of Dr. Keathley’s personal overview will follow on Wednesday, with the BioLogos response to be posted on Thursday and Friday. Even as we move forward with this dialogue on the pages of the BioLogos Forum its form will continue to develop, as each paper and response will reflect the scholarly expertise and style of its particular author, even though writing as representatives of opposing perspectives on these issues of science and faith. For instance, this first essay from Dr. Keathley is introductory and thereby covers a broader scope of issues than the pieces that will follow, and similarly, our response gives pointers towards how we intend to build upon this beginning, rather than exhaustive arguments.

But whether a paper in this series frames the breadth of the debate in clear terms or delves into specific issues more deeply, our intention in initiating this series together was not to engage in a tit-for-tat argument, but rather, for each of us to take the points of the other under serious consideration, recognizing them as issues with which the church needs to think carefully about together going forward. In other words, we understand these papers to be the beginning of a more charitable and respectful engagement with our brothers and sisters in Christ, not the end of the discussion.

Over the coming months, six more Southern Baptist Voices will post essays to follow Dr. Keathley’s introductory essay. Biologos will post a response to each. The essays yet to come are as follows:

  • Dr. John D. Laing, Associate Professor of Theology and Philosophy, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary will write on “Evolution and Death.”
  • Dr. Bruce Little, Professor of Philosophy and Director of the L. Russ Bush Center for Faith and Culture, Southeastern Baptist Seminary will write on “Evolution and Essentialism.”
  • Dr. John Hammett, Professor of Systematic Theology and Associate Dean, Theological Studies, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary will write on “Evolutionary Creationism and the Imago Dei.”
  • Dr. Steve Lemke, Provost, and Professor of Philosophy and Ethics, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, will write on "Evolution and the Problem of Evil."
  • Dr William Dembski, Research Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Richard Land Center for Cultural Engagement, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary will write on “Is Darwinism Theologically Neutral.” (BioLogos does not subscribe to Darwinism, but Dr. Dembski has chosen this title and we will respond to it.)
  • Dr. James K Dew, Assistant Professor of the History of Ideas and Philosophy, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary will write on “Teleological Arguments, Theistic Evolution, and Intelligent Design.”

Given the commitment to productive dialogue on the part of both BioLogos and our Southern Baptist colleagues, we hope that this paper and the ones that will follow will generate important conversation on our site and beyond. But because public discourse in this area has not always been productive, or even always civil, we at BioLogos have decided to adjust the way we invite the engagement of our readers with these posts. In short, we want to make sure that the comments and discussion here occur with the spirit of respect that we have pledged to maintain in the essays themselves. First of all, though we will publish Dr. Keathley’s essay and our response in two parts each, we will not open the essays to comments until later this week when both papers have been posted in their entireties. Our hope is that this procedure will encourage thoughtful consideration of each section of the arguments as well as their wholes. Furthermore, in addition to reminding readers to adhere to our commenting guidelines, we will be more actively monitoring the comments as they are posted so that both tone and content are consistent with the BioLogos aim of creating a space of conversation, rather than confrontation.

We hope and pray that this dialogue will bring greater clarity to the issues at hand, charity towards those with whom we disagree, and glory to our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.


Darrel Falk is former president of The BioLogos Foundation. He transitioned into Christian higher education 25 years ago and has given numerous talks about the relationship between science and faith at many universities and seminaries. He is the author of Coming to Peace with Science.
Mark Sprinkle is an artist and cultural historian, and was formerly Senior Web Editor and Senior Fellow of Arts and Humanities for The BioLogos Foundation. A phi beta kappa graduate of Georgetown University, he received his M.A. and Ph.D. in American Studies from the College of William and Mary, where he studied how artworks embody complex relationships in different cultural contexts. Since 1996 he has been an independent artist and frame-maker, also regularly writing and speaking on the role of creative practices in cultural mediation and renewal, especially in the area of science and Christian faith. Mark and his wife Beth home-schooled their three boys, and are active in the local home-school community in Richmond, Virginia.

Next post in series >


View the archived discussion of this post

This article is now closed for new comments. The archived comments are shown below.

Loading...
Page 1 of 1   1
HornSpiel - #68273

February 28th 2012

As a SBC member I welcome this dialog.  I hope that it may help those of us who do hold to a biologos position to feel more connected to our church. I pray that a respectful dialog will be a result and this will be a mark a significant rapprochement between these two points of view.

Thanks to both Biologos and the SB seminaries for being willing to put this discussion on line.


revjdhill - #68336

March 3rd 2012

I am an SBC minister and did my ThM at Southeastern under one of the professors that will be writing one of these articles. As a SB who holds to the biologos view, I can’t tell you how excited I am about this discussion. I agree with HomSpiel above, and hope this does help us become more connected. 



pastorscott - #68429

March 9th 2012

This will be one of the best and most helpful projects to date for those of us on the front lines of pastoral ministry.  Thank you!


Joshua Stewart - #75700

December 27th 2012

I am still waiting for Steve Lemke’s article. Any idea when it will be available? 


Page 1 of 1   1