Introducing the BioLogos Navigator

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December 27, 2012 Tags:

Today's entry was written by Mark Sprinkle. You can read more about what we believe here.

Introducing the BioLogos Navigator
One of 23 Topic Landing Pages accessible through the BioLogos Navigator

When we at BioLogos affirm that, “all things hold together in Christ,” what do we mean? In short, we believe that there is no aspect of creation or of human experience that does not fall under the sovereignty and authority of God, and that He does not claim for himself and intend for redemption. After all, at his resurrection, Jesus himself said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me” (Matthew 28:18). But more than just proclaiming God’s sovereignty over creation, we believe that God is revealing himself in every aspect of creation, as well—that led by the Holy Spirit, we will find pointers to God wherever we turn our gaze. Christian knowledge, therefore, is not limited to the study of the Scriptures or of Church History, but includes the study of the natural world and of all of human culture, as well. In fact, to fully appreciate God’s abundant grace and providence, we need to be looking to all of these domains of knowledge as domains of revelation, too.

Part of the BioLogos mission, then, is to show how all things hold together in Christ—to show how a Christian worldview integrates the knowledge we have of God through the Scriptures with the knowledge we have of God through the other areas in which he reveals himself as Creator and Redeemer. Our website contains a wealth of Christian scholarship in a wide range of fields—from biology, to cosmology, to mathematics, to Biblical studies, to history, to theology—all demonstrating that the best contemporary science is compatible with Biblical Christian faith. But today we introduce a new tool—the BioLogos Navigator—to make these posts more accessible, and to show how they inter-relate (see sidebar on the right).

Modeled on the astrolabes that early astronomers and sailors used to orient themselves under the heavens, our Navigator makes the cross of Christ the starting point by which we understand the cosmos. Each of the four arms of the cross represents one of the domains of knowledge and experience through which God reveals himself to the world: Scripture, the Church, Nature and Culture. These domains are not in opposition to each other, but are complementary and inter-related areas through which we can recognize God at work in the world. Linking these four domains is a network of specific topics relevant to the science and faith conversation. Their arrangement suggests how each relates to the four domains but also to teach other. Clicking on an individual topic tag highlights not only that topic, but other topics that are linked to it—sometimes in unexpected ways.

Clicking a topic tag a second time takes you to the Topic Landing page: a curated selection of the best resources on that subject from the BioLogos archives. (The image above shows the Christianity & Science—Then and Now Landing page, complete with Navigator and highlighted tags.) At the bottom of each page is a link to our Resource Finder, where you can investigate additional materials on that topic, as well. By exploring the relationships between the topics on the Navigator itself, and by delving deep into each topic via the resources presented on the landing pages, readers can focus on specific aspects of the harmony between science and Christian faith while also getting the wide view of God’s providential work in all things in the heavens and on the earth.

In the coming days and weeks, the BioLogos Navigator will be more fully integrated into the rest of the site, accessible directly from the Forum homepage and from the Resources dropdown list at the top of every page. We’ll also be including features that help place each blog post on the “knowledge map” defined by the domains and topic tags. Finally, the Topic Pages will also be periodically updated with the latest and best new materials in each topic. In the meantime, you can access the Navigator by clicking anywhere on the small image in the sidebar, above, and find a link to this post at the upper right corner of our homepage. So take some time to explore our site with this new tool, which we think will to help orient our readers in the science and faith conversation, while always pointing to Jesus, the Christ, through whom all things were made.



Mark Sprinkle is an artist and cultural historian, and was formerly Senior Web Editor and Senior Fellow of Arts and Humanities for The BioLogos Foundation. A phi beta kappa graduate of Georgetown University, he received his M.A. and Ph.D. in American Studies from the College of William and Mary, where he studied how artworks embody complex relationships in different cultural contexts. Since 1996 he has been an independent artist and frame-maker, also regularly writing and speaking on the role of creative practices in cultural mediation and renewal, especially in the area of science and Christian faith. Mark and his wife Beth home-schooled their three boys, and are active in the local home-school community in Richmond, Virginia.


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W W W - #76427

February 7th 2013

After all, at his resurrection, Jesus himself said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me” (Matthew 28:18). But more than just proclaiming God’s sovereignty over creation, we believe that God is revealing himself in every aspect of creation, as well—that led by the Holy Spirit, we will find pointers to God wherever we turn our gaze. Christian knowledge, therefore, is not limited to the study of the Scriptures or of Church History, but includes the study of the natural world and of all of human culture, as well. In fact, to fully appreciate God’s abundant grace and providence, we need to be looking to all of these domains of knowledge as domains of revelation, too.


Muhammad Rizwan - #80102

May 15th 2013

Each of the four 642-427 vce of the cantankerous represents one of the domains of ability and acquaintance through which God reveals 642-427 exam collection to the world: Scripture, the Church, Nature and Culture. These domains are not in action to anniversary other, but are commutual and inter-related areas 642-427 exam training


nilesh jain - #80433

May 23rd 2013

“Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth.”

sarees


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