i About the BioLogos Forum

The BioLogos Forum is designed to foster a serious and comprehensive discussion of Christian faith and the sciences. We believe that charitable engagement of different perspectives within the Church helps sharpen our thinking and deepen our commitment to the truth that is hidden in Christ. So while many of the articles and videos under the distinctive Forum banner come from BioLogos staff and Senior Fellows, we feature a range of voices, including those that disagree with us and with each other. Unless otherwise noted, views expressed are those of the authors, not necessarily of The BioLogos Foundation. You can read more about what we believe here, and join the conversation in the comments section at the end of each post.

Burnett, Thomas

Thomas Burnett

Thomas is a former BioLogos Associate Editor. As a science writer, he has also worked for the American Scientific Affiliation, National Academy of Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has degrees in philosophy and the history of science from Rice University and University of California, Berkeley.

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Philosophical and Ethical Foundations of Science

2 Part Series: Foundations, Goals, and Limits of Science

In this two-part essay, Burnett explores the philosophical and ethical principles that make science possible. He contends that by examining the goals and limits of science, we will find that science is not a rigid, impersonal assemblage of facts, but a dynamic, distinctly human enterprise.
October 25, 2012 
Thomas Burnett 
Science & Worldviews 
 
David Lack and Darwin’s Finches

2 Part Series: David Lack and Darwin's Finches

Not only are evolution and biblical faith compatible, but committed Christians have been at the forefront of evolutionary science ever since Darwin published On the Origin of Species in 1859. This series looks at David Lack, an ornithologist and devout Christian who contributed greatly to the understanding of Darwin's finches.
November 18, 2009 
Thomas Burnett 
History of Life 
 
The God Who Acts: Robert John Russell on Divine Intervention and Divine Action, Part 1

2 Part Series: The God Who Acts: Robert John Russell on Divine Intervention and Divine Action

Does God need to supernaturally "intervene" in order to bring about the diversity of life that we observe today? Is that kind of action different from God’s ordinary action? We begin our three-part series with Robert John Russell’s description of how views of divine action have changed throughout history, excerpted from his book Cosmology: From Alpha to Omega. Part 2 addresses why “intervention” in the natural world is a problem philosophically, theologically, and scientifically; and Part 3 explains Russell’s own theory of divine action in the natural world.
May 23, 2012 
Thomas Burnett, Robert John Russell 
Divine Action & Purpose 
 
Surveying George Murphy’s Theology of the Cross

Surveying George Murphy’s Theology of the Cross

If God himself is willing to die, particularly in such a gruesome way, then perhaps we should at least consider the possibility of God allowing the death of other creatures, too. But would this really be compatible with what we know of God through Scripture?
December 04, 2012 
Thomas Burnett 
Christ & New Creation 
1
 
What is Scientism?

What is Scientism?

Scientism is a rather strange word, but for reasons that we shall see, a useful one. Though this term has been coined rather recently, it is associated with many other “isms” with long and turbulent histories: materialism, naturalism, reductionism, empiricism, and positivism.
June 11, 2012 
Thomas Burnett 
Science & Worldviews 
44
 
Creation? Which Creation?

Creation? Which Creation?

In addressing the subject of creation, William P. Brown contends that there is not one story but seven contained in the sacred texts of the Judeo-Christian tradition. The books of Genesis, Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Isaiah each provide unique perspectives of the natural world.
November 15, 2011 
Thomas Burnett 
Creation & Origins 
59